Hay

Geology

Group Leader Lorraine Wibberley

Hay U3A geology group have field trips in the Spring/Summer : usually six meetings per year.

We are a small group, with usually about 10 people coming along. We are very friendly and welcoming!
We will be pulling together our 2019 programme soon but to give you an idea, this is what we got up to in the second half of 2018.

2018 Programme

On Monday July 9th we joined John Crellin and the Brecknock Botany Group on a visit to Clydach Terrace, an area of old ironstone and coal mining.

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On 13th August 2018 led by Wendy and Mo, we went to Kington and Hergest Ridge. In the morning we walked around Kington for approximately 3km in and around the town looking at rocks from the Devonian and Silurian geological periods, as well as landscape evidence from the last Ice Age. We followed the old tramline for a short section of the walk and saw evidence of the mills which were once numerous in and around the town.
Lunch at The Burton Hotel in Kington.
Afternoon. Walk up onto Hergest Ridge for a round trip of about 6km with fantastic views of the surrounding area, learnt a little more about the quarries to the north, as well as the rocks and how they have helped shape the landscape. We saw evidence from the last Ice Age in the form of erratics and an overflow channel. We also found out more about the racecourse at the top of the hill.
Post Hergest Ridge Walk. Tea, cakes and ice cream at the Hergest Croft Gardens café.

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On the 24th, 25th and 26th September the group went to Anglesey for an excellent field trip exploring the geology of the coastal areas of the island. Our trip included a tour of Beaumaris castle, a walk to see the abandoned coastal Portwen Brickworks and an arch like a mini Durdle Dor, a fascinating visit to the wonderful Copper Kingdom Museum and the awesome Parys Mountain Copper quarry. We explored Cemaes and learnt about subduction and the 600 million year old geology with the multi-coloured melange, the Cliffs of Carmel Head with their Pre-Cambrian gneisses which are oldest rocks in Wales and in Treaddur Bay we saw early folds of volcanic ash. On our last day we walked along the sand-dune backed beach to Ynys Llanddwyn – a narrow finger of land, but inaccessible due to high tide. We did gat the chance to see pillow lava on the beach though. We managed to visit the Neolithic burial chamber, Bryn Celli Ddu in village called Llandaniel Fab (not a typo!), “one of the most evocative archaeological sites in Britain” -Cadw

Finally before departure we popped into Llanfairpg railway station to view the iconic station sign and take our "Hay U3A On Tour" photo.

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More Group Pages
Art Appreciation Art History Group
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Country Dancing Current Affairs
Film Club Garden Visits
Geology Jazz Appreciation
Music-All Scrabble
Strollers