Palmers Green & Southgate

Book Group 1

Group Coordinator: Sue Cook, 020 8882 0423
4th Tuesday pm

The Tuesday afternoon book group continues meeting with much enthusiasm. It is held on the 4th Tuesday of each month and meets in members' houses.

Our books show a variety of tastes and genres and have generated much discussion and laughter.

2019 Book Choices included a a variety of reads from the popular and recently published works, to Costa and Booker prize winners and nominees as well as non fiction works. Read our reviews below.
Corona Virus has not stopped us reading. We are now meeting on Zoom

OUR NEXT BOOK
September 2020: The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

January 2020

A Gap of Time by Jeanette Winterson

The gap of time by Jeanette Winterson a re telling of the winters tale ..a story of love ..loss.. jealousy and redemption
Dispute the thumbs up from many reviews,most of our group did not find it an enjoyable read.
Which made it a very lively discussion Some felt this modern adaptation did not deliver...too graphic and in your face with many loose ends ,whereas the original was more in the style of a parable ,/fairy tale,
Verdict.. would recommend

February 2020

Golden Child by Claire Adam

Set in Trinidad, Peter and Paul are identical twins. Peter is educationally bright and is the 'Golden Child'. Paul due to problems at birth is considered, as stated in the novel, 'retarded'. After a burglary in the family home, Paul disappears. He is kidnapped mistakenly by a gang under the instigation of his uncle (Romesh) who is trying to get hold of the money Clyde (the twins father) has inherited from a relative which he has invested abroad to provide for Peter's education. The book has many different strands and was discussed at length. Amongst the topics were: Parental choice and sibling preference, jealousy, how decisions effect the lives of others.
A very interesting book which is simple on the surface with deep implications.
Verdict .. another good read
Frances

March 2020

The French Gardener by Santa Montefiore

This book a gentle, easy story. The sort of novel you would take on holiday. Not at all taxing and very predictable.
The two parallel stories. The first about Miranda, David and their two unruly children who move to the country from London. Miranda depicted as a stereotypical Chelsea type city dweller and David the successful business man who can't wait to ship his wife out of the way so he can safely continue his affair with her best friend. Surprise, surprise! Miranda during the novel becomes enchanted with the country due to the arrival of the very handsome Jean Paul. He single handedly tames the children with his love of nature, and converts the gardens back to their former glory. A bit to good to be true (?).
Underlying this novel is the journal that Miranda finds written by Ava in the parallel story.

This about Jean Paul's relationship with Ava. She is the original occupant of Hartington Hall together with her older husband Philip and their three children. Philip travels a lot Handsome Jean Paul arrives.He has come to learn about gardening. Anyway, predictably Ava and Jean Paul have an affair which only ends because Ava feels loyalty to her husband. This leaves Jean Paul so bereft forevermore that he can't ever forge another relationship with another woman despite being so very young and handsome.

The ending is not 'happy ever after' as we find out Ava died. However all is not lost as Jean Paul is introduced to a daughter he never knew he had by Miranda, who took a long time to click on to the fact that the story in the journal related to Jean Paul's past affair.

The story was in all sense of the word predictable. The characters I felt lacked much depth and were quite sterotypical. The ending was also true to the genre. Not a favourite read amongst our members!

April 2020

The Beekeeper of Aleppo

We all have heard about the tragedy that is Syria and it's consequences for it's refugees. This book reinforces this journey not only the physical one, but the mental one as well, of one fictional couple. Though simply written, the book is very, very thought provoking. The 'flashbacks' to the couples previous happy lives combined with the description of the beauty of the Syrian countryside compared to their ongoing situation in the novel adds to the trauma. I found it a hard read.

Nuri and Afra lead a 'normal' successful life with their son and family in Aleppo. How quickly this degenerates. When their son is tragically killed by a bomb in their back garden, Afra is blinded physically. She blames herself for her son's death, leaving is a desertion of his life.
At this point Nuri is the stronger pragmatist encouraged by his cousin Mustafa who has made the journey already, he insists they must go or stay and be killed. The journey they make I found harrowing to the extreme. What they saw and endured. Two incidents stuck in my mind. The two brothers pimped in the camp. and Afra's rape towards the end of the book 'in part payment' for their onward journey.

Another theme that runs through the book is Nuri and Afra suffering from PTSD. Afra's blindness is psychological. Nuri's imagined small boy, who looks and dresses in the same way as his son but disappears. As Afra becomes stronger so Nuri becomes weaker.

This is a very deep multi faceted book. It warrants much more discussion. We all found it a profound read which we will remember for a long time. Hopefully we can meet the author at some point to discuss different aspects of the story

May 2020

A Gentleman in Moscow Amos Towles

The novel begins in 1922 with the trial of aristocrat Count Rostov by a Bolshevik tribunal, where he is sentenced to house arrest indefinitely in the Metropol Hotel in Moscow. Instead of his usual suite, the Count must now live in a small attic room at the hotel, without many of the trappings of his former life.
The story details Rostov’s life, adapting to the changes in Russia — and shows some endearing friendships — with a chef, an actress, and a nine-year-old girl. The count has lost his family; his possessions; and his social standing, and more importantly, he is about to watch as everything he loves about Russian life is going to be uprooted systematically by the new regime. "But he has two things going for him; his upbringing as a gentleman and ingrained optimism. "It is this — being a person of honour, that allows him to navigate the three decades in the hotel.” (Irish Examiner)
Unbeknown to me when I picked this book was its relevance to the situation we find ourselves in today – as we are almost in a kind of house arrest at the moment. I think the book puts a very glossy sheen on the harsh and difficult times experienced by many of the population of the USSR post revolution. The millions who starved in the Ukraine in the early thirties and the suffering of the Second World War glossed over in a few sentences. But it is a book of fantasy, and if we can accept that, it is a light and very enjoyable read. It is beautifully written with a satisfying if unexpected ending.

June 2020

In Our Mad and Furious City by Guy Gunaratne

This timely novel is set in the present London of tower blocks and social deprivation, and is told by five interlinked voices – three of young men from immigrant backgrounds and two of their older relatives. Lots of contemporary issues are raised – radicalisation, political violence, social exclusion, etc. But despite the seriousness of the subject matter, this is a very compelling read – we see a world which we are aware of - which many of us live alongside - from the inside, through the words of these young men. And although their youth culture and some of their vocabulary might be alien to us, there is an energy to their language which carries the reader along. The stories of the two older relatives are poignant accounts of earlier immigrant struggles. Underlying the whole is a plot which comes to an exciting and tragic conclusion. So this is not a particularly easy read, but provoked a very sympathetic and thoughtful response from our Group.
Mick

July 2020

Girl, Woman Other, Bernadine Evaristo

Bernadine Evaristo is a Anglo-Nigerian award winning author of 7 books and verse fiction that explore aspects of African life past, present, real and fiction. Girl, Woman, was joint winner of the Booker Prize for Fiction in 2019. Bernadine Evaristo is Professor of Creative writing at Brunnel University and Vice Chair of the Royal Society of Literature. She was made an MBE in 2009.
Initially I wondered about the fact that there was little punctuation and no full stops but this didn’t matter once I got reading. The author said in an interview that she wanted the prose to be free flowing.

It is a book about racism and sexism. The book is divided into 4 chapters with three characters in each section. The 12 women have connections to others in the story. It is a story of pain, joy and friendship from a wide range of backgrounds and heritage. I did wonder about the symbols at the beginning of each chapter. Apparently, it is a West African Adinkra drawing symbolising a salient quality of that section’s protagonist.
Sue P

August 2020

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owen

Opinions about this book were mixed and varied.
General consensus was that the murder mystery element kept one's interest but that some of the story lines were unbelievable, such as a lone child living and surviving in the swamps and marshlands of Carolina, from the age of 6,after being deserted by her parents and siblings. We wondered why the locals kept away and ignored her.
The book is well written, with the author using her knowledge of the natural world of the area to weave the flora and fauna into the story. The author now lives on a remote ranch 25miles from the Canadian border and is a bit of a recluse herself.
We could not really understand why the book has been so successful both in the USA, over 52 weeks in the bestseller list, and 23 weeks in the Top 10 paperback charts here.
We thought the book was very cinematic and the film rights were snapped up straight away. It is an easy read and in spite of our criticisms worth a read. A bit of escapism in these Covid times.
Gloria

September 2020

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

October 2019

Property by Lionel Shriver

The book was titled Property by Lionel Shriver and has 12 short stories all roughly entering around property/ownership etc. Very well written and although serious subjects also extremely funny. A lot of us saw ourselves in some of the stories
I have picked out some which made me think about my attitudes but mostly made me laugh.

Domestic Terrorism. 32 year old son who refuses to leave home and “do something with his life” his mother’s views, not his!

Vermin. Raccoons making their home in a ten inch gap between a wall and the house. Embraced when the tenants are happily renting but got rid of when they become owners of the property

Paradise to Perdition. Villain escaping to a luxury resort in Spain. Tires of the good life with no arguments , no company and Gives himself up to return to prison to relieve the boredom.

November 2019

Killers of The Flower Moon by David Grann#

In November we read 'Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann'.
The book traces how the Osage Native Americans were forced to leave their tribal lands to live on a barren piece of rocky land in Kansas. Soon oil was discovered and this was the beginning of a series of terrible injustices and murders brought about by the Osage becoming rich. The FBI was in its infancy and aided the investigation.
Most of the group found this an interesting and informative book, and quite an easy read. Although historical non-fiction it almost reads like a thriller. The paperback edition comes complete with photographs which help to identify the different characters, of which there are many.
The author is a journalist who was able to use both archive material, and information from descendants of those involved, to embellish his book. A good read.

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More Group Pages
Art 1 Art 2
Art 3 Art 4
Art 5 Art Appreciation
Big Band Book Group 1
Book Group 2 Book Group 3
Book Group 4 Bowls
Bridge Club Online Bridge for Beginners
Bridge for Improvers 1 Bridge for Improvers 2
British History Climate Change
Come Dine with Me Current Affairs
Discussion Floristry 1
Floristry 2 Free Lunchtime Concerts
French Conversation Fringe Theatre
Garden Visits Gardening
Gentle Exercise Italian Conversation 1
Italian Conversation 2 Latin
Magic for Beginners Members On Their Own
Members On Their Own 2 Morning Walks
Museums Music Appreciation
Outings Photography
Play Reading 1 Play Reading 2
Poetry Remember When
Round the World Dining Rummikub
Rummikub and Bolivia Canasta Science, Nature,Technology
Scrabble 1 Scrabble 2
Singing for Fun Spanish for Beginners
Spanish for Improvers T48: The Light-Dining Group
Textiles Theatre
Travel Walks (7-10 miles)
Wine Appreciation