Mawdesley Villages

Archaeology

Contact : PETER on 07956397866 or email using the link.

Update 20th October

Private Facebook Page for Archaeology Updates; Interest in this was equalled by a dislike of Facebook, so I am not proceeding with this to ensure we do not exclude anybody, and will instead continue to rely on U3A Group Page updates. When there is a new update this will be flagged in Yvonne's Newsletter.

The Group Page now includes a link to my email so people can send me items/links of interest which I can circulate in the next Update- please do so as this should generate a wider range of items.

Internet links and other References should now be easier to access as they will now be referenced numerically in the text (01),(02) etc with the links listed with reference numbers in sequence. The previous alphabetic links will be kept on the Page so people can refer back if they wish.

Clay Pipes; Clay pipes produced between the 17th and early 20th centuries are one of the most common finds locally. There is a good chance you will find stems on any walk across ploughed fields or digging in the garden. Bowls are rarer - we found a couple in our back garden several years ago and I used this article Link 01 to identify them as being produced in Rainford in the 18th century. Maybe somebody has a collection or knows somebody who has one? I have seen a reference to clay pipe production in Croston and will let you know when I find out more.

DNA Revolution; For those who like to see the big picture have a look at this article on how DNA research is revolutionising archaeologists' views on whether cultural changes are due to migrations or transmission of ideas, rethinking ideas about origins of racial groups, and how homo-sapiens interbred with other vanished groups etc. Link 02

There is a lot more detail in the book 'Who we are and how we got here' but it is a pretty dense read and the main highlights are in the Guardian article. Also worth noting that this revolution is still under way and will continue for some time as DNA samples are taken from more ancient humans.

Meanwhile.............

Burscough Roman Fort Update; Fieldwork this year has been very limited because of Covid plus ongoing disputes with the adjacent landowner. However further resistivity survey appears to confirm a road leaving the western entrance of the fort adding to earlier survey work showing eastern and southern entrances. Hopefully excavation will resume in 2021.

CBA Internet Festival of Archaeology Part 2; Part 2 of the Council for British Archaeology Online Festival of Archaeology starts on the 24th October, Link 03

Have a look as content is diverse and there should be something of interest to everybody.

Future Learn Courses
Christine recommends the Future Learn Course 'From Dig to Lab' which she has completed Link 04 https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/archaeology, and has also enrolled on 'Lancaster Castle and Northern English History' Link 05, and hopefully she will also feed back on this one.

Previous information

The free Future Learn course on Starr Carr which ia recommended has re-opened - link on this page.

Message from Peter:

I would like to explore interest in setting up a Private Facebook Group. I would need sufficient interest to make this worthwhile. If you are interested contact Peter?

Internet resources that may be of interest, links to them are included on this page :-

Last Talk on Roman North Wales
There is a link to it on this page . Peter thinks that this is the most interesting of the series as it sheds new light on the Roman occupation in North Wales, and maybe northern England.

The Roman Fort at Burscough has (at long last) been listed by Historic England.
Peter now has more information on the current situation with this site, in particular with regard to the action and situation with the landowner.

It will be interesting to see what happens next as HE are very demanding about excavations on Listed Sites, also we will see whether the listing restrains the activities of the landowner of the northern part of the area. There is a link to the listing on this page.

Many of you probably already know about Horace the Elk at the Harris Museum. Horace provides the earliest evidence of human habitation in Lancashire. I particularly like that a) The Elk was discovered by an ordinary bloke inquisitive about a hole being dug on land next to his house. b) That his Mrs insisted it was displayed not at the British Museum but at the Harris. For those not familiar a concise talk is featured in the Council for British Archaeology Online Archaeology Festival mentioned below at can be accessed via link on the page..

The Council for British Archaeology online Festival of Archaeology starting 11th July may be of interest.

A report of survey work undertaken prior to the latest re-incarnation of Croston Hall

Free access to the American Archaeology magazine.

Further instalment of Romans in North Wales.

Council for British Archaeology are current offering free downloads.

Speaker from Gwynedd Archaeological Trust on Roman Forts in North Wales (not a great speaker but worth staying with).

Also Dig Ventures are offering a free course on fieldwork which I am currently enrolled on and is being repeated from 1st June (informative and entertaining).

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LIDAR is basically airborne laser that detects variations in relief including hidden archaeological sites.

Some useful sights are available from links to the right.

LIDAR finder: You will see this viewer cunningly allows you to scan across the LIDAR and aerial photos.

National Library of Scotland : Best to view the LIDAR on the 'Side by Side' option with the Bing aerial photo view. There are also interesting old maps on this site.

Advice from Peter: DSM 1m or DTM 1m are the best options to view the LIDAR. DSM scans everything and DTM ignores features high above ground which is useful if you want to view ground below forests etc and he comments "My general impression is that there is a lot of 'noise' due to recent agriculture, mining etc, but it can throw up interesting things."

Suggestion to keep our interest going is Futurelearn online courses (https://www.futurelearn.com/), perhaps Hadrians Wall or Forensic archaeology under 'History'. If others have any other suggestions then tell Peter and they can be passed on to all in the group.

Web sites relevant to planned future programme:
Lunt Meadows:- https://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/lunt-meadows-sefton

Burscough Roman Fort:- https://fortinthewood.org.uk/

Duddon Valley:- https://www.duddonhistory.org.uk/

Lancashire Roman Roads:- http://www.romanroads.org/gazetteer/lancspages.html

Formby Coastal Archaeology:- https://www.citizan.org.uk/discovery-programmes/liverpool-bay/
http://formby-footprints.co.uk/index.html

Other web sites of possible interest:
A talk by (ex-Time Team) Stewart Ainsworth on Landscape Archaeology and use of LIDAR. https://digventures.com/

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More Group Pages
Acrylic Painting for Absolute Beginners Archaeology
Art Badminton
Bird Watching and Nature Group Book Club 1
Book Club 2 Book Club 3
Book Club 4-Wednesday Readers Breakfast Club
Bridge Chess
Cinema Circle Dancing
Community Mornings Craft
Creative Writing Group Crown Green Bowls
Cycling Group 1 Cycling Group 2
Dog Walkers Drama
Economics Family and Social History Research
Family History Research Fishing
French Conversation Gardening
Geology Golf for all abilities
Human Body IT
Italian Keep Fit Keep Moving
Kurling Line Dancing
Luncheon Club Mah Jongg
Newsletter Philharmonic: Live Music
Philosophy Photography
Pilates Poetry
Pop-up-Classes Recycling
Scrabble Shakespeare
Singing for Pleasure Social Group
Spanish Advanced Spanish Improvers
Speaker Squash
Street Bowling Table Tennis
Tap Dancing Ten Pin Bowling
Tennis Theatre
Travel Group Ukulele Group
Walking Walking Football
Walking in Foreign Lands Watercolour Painting
Weekenders Sat/Sun Wood Carving
Yoga