Guisborough

Music Appreciation

Venue: Sunnyfield House - Mondays monthly - 2-3pm

Activity Charge: £1

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Programme for 2020 meetings:

Feb. 3rd. Climate Change
March 2nd. John Rutter
April 27th. Beethoven (250th Anniversary)
May 11th. Birds, Fish and Fishermen
June 8th. "Summer is a cumin in"
July 27th. Music about mythical figures
Sept.7th. Chamber Music
Oct. 5th. Tenor Arias
Nov. 2nd. Violin Concertos
Dec. 14th Winter Celebrations

All start at 2.00pm in the Bistro at Sunnyfield House
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We offer a warm welcome to new members. Contact the Group Coordinator, Peta, on 01287-632875, or 'Click to send a message' in the right-hand column – or simply come along to our next monthly meeting (see above).

We usually bring along CDs or tracks related to a topic decided in advance, play the pieces and talk about them a little. Members bring along any type of music they want -- popular, folk songs, jazz, classical, opera ... as long as there's some link with that month's topic. A typical piece might be 5--7 minutes long.

As a variation on this, at some meetings Peta or another member will prepare a topic in advance. Past topics covered in this way have included the composer Modest Mussorgsky, the development of the piano from its origins up to the present day, and Schubert's development as a composer. These talks are always comprehensively illustrated with recorded music.

We plan to update this page each month with details of what we heard and discussed and, where possible, provide links to the music. You may also want to sample some of the programmes in our archive, which is full of links to music, videos and textual information -- please click on the link in the right-hand column.

In FEBRUARY 2020 the topic was 'music related in some way to climate change'.

The first piece of music was 'A song of our warming planet' by Daniel Crawford, a sequence of notes representing the global average temperature of each year from 1880 to 2012, each rise/fall of a semitone corresponding to a 0.03 deg C rise/fall in temperature. The cello piece only lasts 100 seconds but gives an astonishing sound picture of global warming.

We also heard Richard Strauss 'Alpine Symphony', Chopin 'Winter Wind' (etude 11), Enya 'White is in the winter night', Ludovico Einaudi 'Elegy for the Arctic', Brian Eno 'Another green world', Orff Springtime from 'Carmina Burana' and the opening of 'Elijah' by Mendelssohn.

The last piece that we heard was a poem about the Rhine in flood, performed live in German by Stan. Here are the German and translated English words (with pairs of lines put together to save space), followed by a commentary:

Die Lorelei by Heinrich Heine

Ich weiss nicht, was soll es bedeuten, Dass ich so traurig bin;
Ein Märchen aus alten Zeiten, Das kommt mir nicht aus dem Sinn.
Die Luft ist Kühl, und es dunkelt, Und ruhig fliesst der Rhein;
Der Gipfel des Berges funkelt Im Abendsonnenschein.

Die schönste Jungfrau sitzet Dort oben wunderbar,
Ihr goldenes Geschmeide blitzet, Sie kämmt ihr goldenes Haar.
Sie kämmt es mit goldenem Kamme Und singt ein Lied dabei;
Das hat eine wundersame, Gewaltige Melodei.

Den Schiffer im kleinen Schiffe Ergreift es mit wildem Weh;
Er schaut nicht die Felsenriffe, Er schaut nur hinauf in die Höh.
Ich glaube, die Wellen verschlingen Am Ende Schiffer und Kahn;
Und das hat mit ihrem Singen Die Lorelei getan.

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I do not know what it means That I should feel so sad;
There is a tale from olden times I cannot get out of my mind.
The air is cool and twilight falls, And the Rhine flows quietly by;
The summit of the mountain glitters in the evening sun.

The fairest maid is sitting In wondrous beauty up there;
Her golden jewels are sparkling, She combs her golden hair.
She combs it with a golden comb And sings a song the while;
It has an awe-inspiring Powerful melody.

It seizes the boatman in his skiff With wildly aching pain:
He does not see the rocky reefs, He only looks up to the heights.
I think at last the waves will swallow the boatman and his boat;
And that, with her singing, The Lorelei has done.

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'Die lorelei' can mean 'mermaid' or 'living rock'. Its origin is Celtic -- the ethnic group living in Northern Europe around 3000 years ago (the Iron Age) when summer temperatures were like today's average of 20 deg C. The soils and contemporary vegetation reveal certain oxygen isotopes to geologists to suggest this. The previous 2000 years of data suggest summers averaging 6-7 deg C.

Climate change as revealed by fossilised rocks, landscape and vegetation has occurred on our Earth frequently since its formation 4.5 billion years ago, but are we speeding up the process by our current activities?

Was the young boatman 'lured' to the turbulent waters or did the flooded Rhine suffer violent unexpected whirlpools and storms?

Stan Robson

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Middle-eastern dance Music Appreciation Needle Crafts Painting
Photography Play Reading Poetry Res Classicae
Russian Literature Science Scrabble Scrap Booking
Singing for Pleasure Spanish Improvers Sunday Luncheon Club Tai Chi
Talks and Walks Walking - Pathfinders Group Walking 1 (7-8 miles) Walking 10 miles
Walking 2 (7-8 miles) Walking 5 - 6 Miles Walking 5 - 8 Miles Walking: Short Walks
More Group Pages
60s/70s Music Ancient Greek
Art Appreciation Beginners Bridge
Book Club Boules
Bowls Bridge Improvers
Canasta Ceramic Art
Creative Writing EXCURSIONS
Flower Club Gardening
Guitar Industry and Infrastructure
Knit and Natter Latin for Fun
Laughter Yoga Mah Jong
Middle-eastern dance Music Appreciation
Needle Crafts Painting
Photography Play Reading
Poetry Res Classicae
Russian Literature Science
Scrabble Scrap Booking
Singing for Pleasure Spanish Improvers
Sunday Luncheon Club Tai Chi
Talks and Walks Walking - Pathfinders Group
Walking 1 (7-8 miles) Walking 10 miles
Walking 2 (7-8 miles) Walking 5 - 6 Miles
Walking 5 - 8 Miles Walking: Short Walks