Cam, Dursley & District

Geology

Latest

Monday 7th October 2019.

Field trip to Leigh`s Quarry, Selsley. Report by David Timby.
Please see link on right.

Tuesday 6th August.

Not our usual day for meeting, but nevertheless, nine members enjoyed a field trip led by our member Ellis Williams to see the strata exposed at Aust Cliff, Aust.

Ellis first told us about the former ferry crossing at this point and although tides run fast at this narrow part of the estuary the passage was short and safe.

He then told us about the underlying rocks here and the surface rocks stretching all the way to Snowdonia and how they were formed in different ages from the Cambrian Period to the Jurassic Period.

This led on to the reasons civil engineers were able to build the first Severn Bridge here. Hard carboniferous limestone outcrops here, some as small islands in the river, and some at the banks with only a shallow covering of silts, enabling the high towers and cable anchors to be put on solid foundations.

We then went further along the foreshore to view the cliff where, in spite of occasional showers Ellis pointed out the anticline (dome shape) of the strata and their composition. All the time he answered our questions and named the rock samples we brought to him.

We then adjourned to The Boars Head in Aust village for a convivial lunch. Many many thanks to Ellis for a most interesting outing.

John Crellin

Monday 1st July 2019

Old fossils visit Birmingham.

Oh dear! I could have worded that better!

On Monday 1st July members of the Geology Group visited the Lapworth Museum of Geology in Edgbaston, Birmingham, part of the University of Birmingham.

After a short slide presentation illustrating the historical background to the museum, we were treated to a conducted tour of the galleries and exhibits, viewing such exciting exhibits as the `Dudley Bug` (a trilobite) and the `Coseley Spider`. Also on display was the fossil of a baby Ichthyosaur, a marine reptile, believed to have been only about two days old when it died, although it had the remains of a belemnite in it`s stomach, so it had had a hearty last meal. We were impressed by a huge floor-to-ceiling display of nearly ninety types of rock, many of which could be touched and examined closely. Also impressive was a cast of dinosaur discovered in the USA, which had the evidence of a broken rib and a broken toe - maybe it had stubbed it on the furniture when it got up in the middle of the night!

Other exhibits included a 1913 seismograph and a fascinating display of minerals and gems, some cut and some uncut.

This was followed by the highlight of the afternoon, a `behind the scenes` tour during which we were able to handle nuggets of silver, gold and platinum, worth tens of thousands of pounds, but sadly we were watched VERY closely at this point. The massive stores, containing 300,000 items, also houses dinosaur eggs (past their `use by` date!) and a sheet of - believe it or not - flexible sandstone which again we were allowed to handle. Ok, so you don`t believe me? Take a look at this:
https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/lapworth-museum/about/object-flexible-sandstone.aspx

The archives included the original notebooks of the famous Victorian geologist, Charles Lapworth, after whom the museum is named, and again we were allowed to handle and look through these. There were also fascinating large-scale geological maps of the D-Day landing beaches, marked `BIGOT`, an acronym for `British Invasion of German Occupied Territory` - a security classification higher than `Top Secret`.

Sadly, the museum did NOT have a skeleton of the very rare blind dinosaur `Idontthinkhesaurus` or it`s dog `Idontthinkhesaurus Rex`, but you can`t have everything!

The museum is open to the public, admission is free, and I challenge anyone to spend an hour there and still assert that geology is boring. It most certainly ain`t!

Report by David Hinder

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Monday 3rd June

In a change to our advertised programme, we watched two very interesting videos in the 'Geological Wonders' series.
First up was 'Erta Ale' - nothing to do with beer, but a fascinating example of a shield volcano with its lava lake, one of only five examples in the world.
After a welcome coffee/tea and a surfeit of biscuits, we settled down to a video about mid-ocean ridges, with particular reference to the Galapagos islands.

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The Group

We are a fairly new group and are following a course of study on a DVD presentation along with talks and site visits, usually meeting on the first Monday of the month in Dursley Methodist Church. We need a Leader for the group who would organise our meetings and visits.

For details of our meetings please have a look at "The Group's Calendar" below.

CAN YOU HELP? We would love to hear from anyone with an expertise in Geology or who has contacts that could be useful in arranging topics for future meetings

Please contact the group by clicking on the blue bird if you would like to be included in the mailing list for meetings.

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Future activities With summer on its way - allegedly - we are itching to get out and about again. A number of possibilites for field trips are being actively investigated, including a Bath Stone quarry, Robinswood Hill and the Malvern geopark. As soon as something definite is arranged, we will be posting the details below.

In the meantime, if you have any other ideas, do let us know.

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The Group's Calendar

Brief details of any forthcoming meetings,outings and one-off activities will be listed below.

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Exciting local(ish) geological discovery!

No need to go to Yorkshire or Derbyshire!

This link takes you to a recently uncovered limestone pavement on the Badgers Wood Geology Trail in Backwell, S of Bristol, between Nailsea and the airport. You can download the leaflet from the website too.

http://backwellenvironmenttrust.org/index.php/2014-04-11-20-09-53/features/121-limestone-pavement

Sounds like a field trip for 2019?

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More Group Pages
Acoustic guitar Archaeology
Architecture Art Appreciation Group
Badminton Bookends
Bookworms Bridge Group
Chapter IV Book Group Church Explorers
Concert Group Craft & Textile Group
Cycling Family History
Fifth Amendment Book Group First Editions Book Group
Folk Dancing Group Foodie Supper Club
French Group French Intermediate Group
Gardening Group Geology
Historic Places Information Technology Help
Kurling Local Flora Group
Lunch Club Mahjong
Members on their own (MOTO) Modern Greek
Natural History Play Reading
Poetry 1 Poetry 2
Recorder Science & Engineering
Scrabble Skittles Friday
Skittles Monday Spanish Group
Table Tennis Table tennis too
Tennis Group The Third Page book group
Theatre Group Travel
Walking Groups Wine Appreciation
Wine Appreciation - Wotton Writers Workshop
Writing For Pleasure