Bulkington Nuneaton & Bedworth

Newsletter

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Monthly Meeting

August

September

July
Last Tuesday 20th July we had an amusing raconteur named Brad Ashton give us a fascinating talk about the antics of 60's and 70's comic personalities, entitled 'The Job of Laughtertime'

Tales from a script writer to the stars Tommy Cooper, Les Dawson, Dick Emery, Frankie Howard, Bruce Forsyth, Hilda Baker, Hattie Jacques, David Frost and Bob Monkhouse.
Many humorous backstage stories and insights.

Group Meetings Updates

Indoor Meetings may commence in Covid secure venues

Required documentation.

Activity Assessment
Day of Use
Personal Assessment
Venue Risk

Rambling now in full swing
Walks every 2nd and 4th Thursdays. - 10:00
Next Ramble 22nd July meeting at 'The Lord Nelson' Ansley, CV10 9PQ. 10:00 and the Leader is Jane.

Computer & Technology Group
We have re-starting meetings at the Bermuda Phoenix venue, Tuesdays 10:30.

Ukulele Group
Now meeting at The Bermuda Phoenix, Tuesdays 10:30.
Will commence meeting at

Art Group
At Bulkington Village Centre , Monday mornings.

Patchwork Group
At BVC every 2nd Monday afternoon.

Poetry Appreciation
Last Friday of the month at Hartshill Community Centre, Mornings.

Art Group at Bermuda Phoenix
Every Thursday 10-12
Commencing 5th August

IT Training Courses

How are your IT skills?

Would you like to use your computer/smartphone/tablet to communicate more effectively with your friends, family and other U3A members, both during and after the lockdown?
Are you in one of the U3A special interest groups such as family history, and want to know how to use your computer for research?
Would you like to use your computer for shopping but don’t know where to start?
Are you worried about computer security and do you want to learn about how to do online shopping/banking safely?
Have you got a new Smart Phone but you don’t know what it does beyond making phone calls and texts?
Do you want to know how to edit and organise all the photos you have on your phone?

BNB U3A wants to help you!!!

BNB U3A have formed a committee of members who are tasked with planning an IT training programme for those who would like to be involved. We have a number of volunteers who are proficient in IT skills and we want to share our skills with those who need it. Because of the current lockdown restrictions, we are not able to have face-to-face sessions at present, so we have devised some other ways of helping you:

A. Website links to technology guides on a large number of topics, that you can browse and learn at your own pace
B. Sign up to a series of emails that will guide you through some technology guides in a structured way
C. Face-to-face sessions via video meetings
D. Web-based/phone support desk for individual support

Do you want to be involved? Link Here >>> NEW - IT Training Info

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Committee Notices

CORONAVIRUS ADVICE FOR MEMBERS IS ON THE NEW - Health & Welfare Page.

U3A Newsletter
The Trust is using the National Newsletter to keep members informed on the latest government advice converning coronavirus covid-19. It is also filled with information, stories and advice from across the U3A movement on how to keep safe and occupied during this difficult time.

Visit the U3A website to sign up for a regular email newsletter here >> U3A Newsletter

SCAM UPDATE

Update
1 - Track and Trace telephone scam - asking for payment card details - DO NOT give these, this service is FREE!
2 - 'Government' Coronavirus tax refund scam - offering cash, DO NOT click any links or reply, just delete!
3 - recently received automatic voice alleging TSB account misuse - do not press any phone keys, hang up and contact your bank on another device!

With the ongoing coronavirus (Covid-19) situation, criminals are playing on people’s confusion to try new scams. Many claim to offer services and products relating to Covid-19, to trick innocent customers into parting with personal information and their money. So here are some tips to help you avoid becoming a victim.

Scams to look out for
Email Spoofing
We have had some Members have their email accounts hacked such that they appear to send you a message, if you reply you then get a request for money or gift cards. I received one today! (24/04). Don't send anything and inform the 'sender' if you can.

Purchase scams offer protective equipment, sanitising products and other desirable goods for sale, that you will never receive. Be careful paying for anything via bank transfer and only buy goods from reputable companies that you know and trust.

Smishing is sending text messages that appear to come from a trustworthy source like the UK government or even your own doctor which try to steal personal or financial information. If you doubt the text’s authenticity, don't click links. Visit www.gov.uk to check any information given. Verify an organisation’s phone number from their website or from old printed correspondence.

Phishing is sending emails which try to make you divulge sensitive personal or financial information. They may appear to be Covid-19 tax refunds, reimbursements from travel bookings, safety advice via email and even donation requests. Fraudsters will try to make you click on links that aren't safe. So think before you click. If in doubt, then don't click. And don’t open any attachments from senders that you don’t know. If you’re still worried, talk to family, friends or someone else you trust.

Vishing is unsolicited phone calls. Always be suspicious of ‘cold-callers’. Don’t be afraid to challenge them or hang up if you can’t verify the caller. Banks, police etc. will never ask for security information, so never give out personal details. If you’re concerned, call the organisation back on the number listed on their website, ideally on a different phone as criminals can sometimes keep the line open. Or if it’s your bank, use the number on the back of your card.

What to do if you’ve been caught out

If you think you’ve been a victim of fraud or given away more information than you wanted to, please contact YOUR BANK as soon as possible. It’s better to be safe than sorry.