Beccles

Previous Meeting Reports

Notes from the inaugural meeting

We met for the first time to talk about what we could do and how we could do it. It was agreed that those who had space should each get one tree planted in the next month. Two members left carrying saplings – oak and wild cherry. The Woodland Trust, which is offering free trees on its web-site, was to be contacted: we shall alert them, and apply for their tree saplings when we are ready with a good site*. When we have bought stakes and protectors we shall apply to the Beccles U3A for the small funding for that expenditure. We agreed that we should keep an eye out for possible sites for trees. It was suggested that anyone having social contacts with a farmer should explore possibilities !

  • Being ready means this:– Young trees survive much better if planted out in wet months – of course ! That means NOW ! Each tree has to be (i) dug in a good spit and a half with a good spreading of the roots; a small scattering of mycorrizal fungi to form a secondary root system supporting the young tree for life; (ii) with a strong vertical cane, of sapling height or more, staking both the sapling and the tree protector (cardboard), (iii) a strong angled stake to tree and protector, angled at around 60 degrees on the windward side of the young tree; (iv) with a tall cane or hedge stick stuck in to mark where the young tree is, when surrounding vegetation grows up in Summer. This cane needs to be at least 6ft tall, and some people put a splash of white paint on the top of it .

30-01-2020 - Meeting

Rather few members, but an excellent meeting, with a new member who has been saving trees from seed and caring for them for 3 to 5 years, but wants to be able to plant them out in the wild.

New member offered to begin to find out who to approach to begin the process of introducing us to the Beccles establishment.

We saw a good gap for a tree and wrote to the parish Council with our suggestion. The reply was very positive, but they suggested that we inform

  • East Suffolk County Council
  • the neighbouring farmer.

This looks like a pattern we will have to follow – all England is owned by someone !

We planted four oaks this month. Places being investigated are:

  • A patch of land between a lay-by and the road where there had been road straightening 30 years ago;
  • an old pit half-filled with fallen trees; and a corner of a field that is neglected and unusable with today's huge farm implements

We sat before a warm open fire with a cold January wind outside. We should be out looking for possible sites, but there is a good day for one thing.and a good day for the other !