Ayr

Art Appreciation

Facilitator: Moira Whalen
Deputy Facilitator: Helena Burgoyne

Frequency: second Thursday of the month, from 10.00 - 12.00
Location: as specified in the programme

The group's aim is to learn together and through each other, while reflecting the interests and talents of the group members.

Recent activities

NB All trips and meetings currently suspended

This month we enjoyed a feast of slides illustrating the Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau Movements which Jean had compiled to accompany her explanation of these movements. Jean informed us that the Arts and Crafts Movement in the late 19th Century spearheaded by William Morris was a reaction against brutish mass production. It was a movement that valued craftsmanship and good design and which used the natural world for inspiration. This movement developed at the turn of the century into various movements around Europe and the States related to each other and recognised as Art Nouveau. Jean made us aware of the common features of Art Nouveau and the ways in which the various schools differed. She brought an extensive range of examples for us to examine. Thanks to Jean for all her hard work!

Thursday 13th February The Horse in Art. Some of us may have wondered at Joy's title, others made guesses as to art works and artists she would choose but none of us were prepared for the delights of her alphabetic canter through the world of equine art with the added challenge of a quiz at the end! Joy took us from the cave paintings at Lascaux (A for Antiquity) through to Damien Hurst and Andy Scott of today. Along the way we learned of the importance of the horse to mankind, the strength and power of their anatomy and their prestige. The artists she chose were representative of many artistic media and the horses depicted belonged to the hunt, war, industry, the sport of kings, myth and legend and the world of entertainment.

2020 got off to a fantastic start with Elaine's presentation on The Glasgow Girls. 1890-1920 saw a flowering of artistic enterprise in Glasgow establishing The Glasgow Style. Unusually for the times, women were highly influential in the movement and Elaine highlighted five of these: Jessie Newbery, Ann Macbeth, Jessie M King and the MacDonald sisters, Margaret and Frances. They had all studied at the Glasgow School of Art under the direction of Fra Newbery. We learned of their expertise in many media including textiles, gesso, jewellery, illustration and ceramics. They were placed firmly in their era both artistically and politically. Elaine enriched her talk with details of their lives and several beautiful slides showing their iconic work.

In December some of us gathered to watch Degas: Passion for Perfection at Moira's home. The DVD has subsequently been circulating amongst the other members of the group. The Seventh Art Film had originally been released by Sky Arts in selected cinemas and featured an exhibition of the extensive collection of Degas work at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. It included interviews with art historians and the curator of the museum and a synopsis of his biography. Degas was prolific and worked in many media with a spirit of adventure. His technique was well grounded in the apprenticeship he undertook as a copyist at the Louvre but his own work was often left incomplete. He hoarded his work claiming to paint purely for himself.

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More Group Pages
Art Appreciation Backgammon
Baking Book Group
Cycling Family Social History
French Conversation Games For Fun
Gardening News Review Group
Outings Philosophy
Practical Art beginners Spanish
Tree Spotting Walking Group
World Lunch Club